Brain Tumour

An enzyme that apparently helps brain tumours grow has been uncovered by researchers at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Centre in Houston. The finding opens the possibility for new approaches to fighting the lethal disease that has thus far proved unstoppable. The study demonstrates the ability of brain tumours to feed and thrive even when deprived of nutrients and oxygen. This happens because of an enzyme known as acetyl-CoA synthetase 2 (ACSS2), which…
A brain tumour is a cancerous or a non-cancerous mass or growth of abnormal cells in the brain. Most common brain tumours develop from cells that support the nerve cells of the brain — glial cells. These tumours are called glioma. Brain tumours can also be named after the part of the brain they are growing in. There are more than 120 different types of brain tumours showing different symptomatology. Some patients don’t show any…
With a surge in the brain related ailments in the world, every year over 2,500 of the Indian children suffer from medulloblastoma, a pediatric malignant primary brain tumour which spreads through the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and frequently metastasize to different locations along the surface of the brain and spinal cord, doctors have said. According to them, in India, every year 40,000-50,000 persons are diagnosed with brain tumour. Of these 20 per cent are children. Until…
In a first-of-its-kind study scientists have found that the cellular makeup of glioblastoma tumours is more heterogeneous than previously suspected. These findings could deepen our understanding of the tumour and lead to the development of more effective responses to this deadly disease. The large-scale census of individual cancer cells that make up the tumour has revealed that they are even more diverse than previously suspected. The study was conducted by scientists at the Broad Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital…
According to a new study by researchers from UK and India the practice of speaking two languages could also help protect the brain in the event of a stroke. In a study conducted on 600 patients in the city of Hyderabad, India, where multiple languages are commonly spoken it was found that those who spoke more than one language had double the chance of recovering from the condition than those who were monolingual. Cognitive functions…
Thursday, 10 December 2015 13:10

Surgeons find new way to save lives

An invention in the field of surgical microscopes will help neurosurgeons in treating brain cancer patients with more accuracy and precision and that too without enhancing their skills or adapt to changes in the operating room. Current microscopes come with limitations as they restrict a surgeon's complete view of the spread of cancer cells and its boundaries in the brain thus making it difficult to remove, according Marek Romanowski. With this new technology called augmented…
Wednesday, 14 October 2015 00:00

Diamonds can help detect early stage cancers

New research has shown that diamonds could help doctors detect cancers in their earliest stages. Nestled inside a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) machine synthetic diamonds light up on scans, alerting doctors to the presence of cancer. Known as nanoscale the technology has been evolved by physicists at the University of Sydney. The diamonds do not switch on by themselves in the scans but do so upon some manipulation. "We've magnetised the atoms within the nano-diamond…
Tuesday, 13 October 2015 11:54

Headaches in Children

There are as many as 150 types of headaches according to the International Headache Society. If your child has recurrent headaches then don’t lose sleep; it may just be one of these 150 types most of which like tension headache and migraine are innocuous though painful. Most headaches in children are due to an illness, cold or fever. Other conditions that cause headaches include sinusitis, infections of throat or ear. However, if the headache worsens…
A family of genes thought to be behind the growth of a wide range of difficult-to-treat tumours has been identified by scientists. Joshua Breunig, the lead author of the study and a research scientist in the Brain Programme at the Cedars-Sinai Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute in the US said that these new genetic findings have opened a way for us to work towards developing targeted therapeutics, which hopefully could be used in the…
A family of genes instrumental in the growth of a wide range of tough to treat brain tumours has been unmasked by a team of scientists at the Cedars-Sinai Board of Governors Regenerative Medicine Institute in the US. The lead author Dr Joshua Breunig said that “following these fresh genetic findings, we propose to evolve targeted therapeutics that in the future may be effective against high-grade brain tumours and increase the survival of patients." It…
Page 1 of 2