Parkinson's Disease

An analysis of more than 3,400 PD patients has shown that a minimum of 150 minutes of physical activity results in much slower declines in quality of life and mobility over two years, compared to those who exercise less. Learn how to slow down if not stop PD in its tracks from this path-breaking study Read more...
Since there are dozens of mutations associated with PD, the world is moving rapidly towards personalised medicine, an approach that factors in the unique genetic and molecular blueprint of each patient. Read about the most promising personalised therapies emerging around the world…therapies that may finally crack the PD puzzle and produce a cure Read more...
Saturday, 08 April 2017 14:50

Deep brain stimulation stirs new hope

Read how a DBS implant, similar to a pacemaker, has altered the lives of thousands of Parkinson’s patients worldwide. A DBS implant stimulates areas of the brain causing neurological and motor symptoms. This is still not a cure, but DBS does come with the promise of giving PD patients far greater mobility and improved quality of life… Read more...
A study on Parkinson's disease, conducted by researchers and a global network of scientists at Northwestern University throws light on how the disease develops and the way it can be treated in the future. According to the findings of the study a mutation in the gene TMEM230 brings about Parkinson's disease. It is associated with a cross- membrane protein that surrounds synaptic vesicles ,which are tiny sacks that store neurotransmitters before they are released to…
At the Tazmanian Boxing Club in north Carson City, clients are receiving much more than training to become pugilists. They are gaining an upper hand in the fight against Parkinson's Disease. Gym owner Francisco Rodriguez has partnered with Nina Vogel, a licensed physical therapist with Carson-Tahoe Health, to offer a therapeutic way for Parkinson’s patients to combat the devastating effects of the neurological disease through the discipline of boxing.
Australian researchers hope discovery can be used to diagnose disorder – now done through process of elimination The researchers from La Trobe University believe their blood test will enable doctors to detect Parkinson’s disease with unprecedented reliability. Photograph: Reuters
Long-term treatment that involves electrically stimulating the spinal cord has improved symptoms of Parkinson's disease in rats. Publishing the results of their study in the journal Scientific Reports, researchers from Duke Medicine are hopeful their findings could help human Parkinson's patients.
Tuesday, 27 October 2015 13:46

Dance your way out of Parkinson's

Everywhere around the world Parkinson's wrecks the lives of thousands of people every year. At particular risk are the elderly. However, where medical science has proved ineffective in curing the disease, dance is stepping in. Sure, by providing an outlet to people afflicted with the crippling neuro disorder to express themselves, world-class dancers and live musicians are opening a new way of dealing with the disease. Read more...
Monday, 12 October 2015 12:26

How marriage can inspire fitness

Women who cycle (or engage in any similar fitness activity) in tow with their spouses, exercise for twice as long as those who do it all by themselves. This is the finding of a study conducted by the Michigan State University’s Department of Kinesiology involving 58 women. The study found out also a dramatic decline in intent among women who cycled by themselves. The group that did it with their husbands had no such problem…meaning…
Nearly 50 per cent of all patients of Parkinson’s suffer from impaired cognitive powers within a decade of being afflicted according to a new study that was published in Medwire News. All the 141 patients in the study had normal cognition at the baseline and had been suffering from the disease for an average of five years. In the six following years that these patients were tracked a large percentage of them developed at least…
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