News

Sunday, 20 March 2016 16:28

High-protein diet lowers stroke risk

Every year thousands of Indians die or are crippled by stroke. Here, however, is a simple way of reducing the risk. Eat lots of protein. It is well known that fat-rich diets promote the build-up of plaques in the arteries, which can lead to atherosclerosis. Similarly, high blood pressure and diabetes are caused by overweight and obesity among other factors. However, the latest study published in the journal Neurology shows that dietary protein may reduce…
Friday, 18 March 2016 09:58

Free will influenced by ‘neural noise'

Where does our ability to make free choices originate? In electrical brain patterns or 'neural noise' according to scientists from the University of California-Davis. According to the research team, including Jesse Bengson, a postdoctoral researcher at the Center for Mind and Brain at UC Davis, the neural noise made by patterns of electrical activity that fluctuate across the brain is important for our perception, cognition and decision-making. It is also behind our ability to make…
In a first-of-its-kind study scientists have found that the cellular makeup of glioblastoma tumours is more heterogeneous than previously suspected. These findings could deepen our understanding of the tumour and lead to the development of more effective responses to this deadly disease. The large-scale census of individual cancer cells that make up the tumour has revealed that they are even more diverse than previously suspected. The study was conducted by scientists at the Broad Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital…
New research has implicated the Kappa Opioid Receptor (KOR)—the primary target for morphine and endogenous opioids— in alcoholism. The delta opioid receptor on the other hand shows high affinity for endogenous enkephalins. KOR is the least understood of the opiate receptor family. Until now alcoholism research focussed primarily on the mu opioid receptor. The FDA approved drug for alcoholics called Naltrexone, for example, acts essentially by blocking opiate action at the mu opioid receptor. The…
For the large number of people who suffer from drug-resistant epilepsy here is some good news: a pill that can beat back seizures, exactly like what a painkiller does to headaches. Of the about 50 million epilepsy patients worldwide, 30 per cent do not respond to currently available anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) and need to undergo surgery. The new "on demand" seizure suppressant pill developed by researchers at the University College London (UCL) in the UK…
A just published paper says that during puberty blood flow levels decrease in boys while they increase in the case of girls. The finding may explain many sex specific psychiatric disorders, such as depression, anxiety and schizophrenia. It was well-known that adult women have higher blood flow than men. But when does this gap begin to form? Researchers, led by Dr. Theodore Satterthwaite of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania appear…
A group of stem cells residing in the outer blood vessel appear to be involved in the brain’s reaction to stroke. These stem cell have the capacity to create news cells and were discovered two years ago by a research team at Sweden’s Lund University. The same scientists have now said that the cells, known as pericytes, break away from the blood vessel, proliferate and migrate to damaged brain areas post a stroke. Here they…
Despite massive advances one question has boggled science: what made humans rise over other animals in the evolutionary process? It may be the fact that they could walk, says a father-son team of scientists at the University of Sydney in Australia. Fascinated by the sight of their son and grandson learning to walk, the scientists probed the deepest depths of evolutionary science before concluding in their just published paper that bipedalism - or walking on…
Are there any particular structures in the brain that help us cope with change and make the right choices in fast moving circumstances? It appears as though there is, if a new study by Stan Floresco at the Brain Research Centre, University of British Columbia, is anything to go by. The study brings to light brain circuits that help us make our choices in changing circumstances by interacting with one another. The results were presented…
If you want your child to grow up and take charge of his life fast then encourage him to engage in less structured activities like free play. To know why read a report published in Frontiers in Psychology by the University of Colorado Boulder. The study states that children involved in structured activities like soccer practice, piano lessons and homework, are less adept at setting and reaching goals independently. Or, they had poorer "self-directed executive…